Science

In 2017, the big mainstream stories of “near-hits” (aka “near-misses”) in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence included episodic dimming of a star caused by possible “alien megastructures,” a large object tearing through our solar system, and video captured by a fighter jet of a weird object capable of incredible maneuvers…

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Neuroscientist Nicho Hatsopoulous and his team taught monkeys that lost limbs through accidents how to control a robotic arm. The work has profound implications on what they call the brain-machine interface. Via University of Chicago “That’s the novel aspect to this study, seeing that chronic, long-term amputees can learn to…

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An NBER paper from 2015 tracks the decline in corporate spending on basic science in R&D, which has become a practical, application-focused line-item in corporate budgets, creating a safe, predictable, and slow cycle of innovation. Deepmind’s AlphaGo Zero — which taught itself to play a remarkable game of…

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By day, “Olivia Doll” sits on the boards of seven academic journals; by night, she’s a Staffordshire terrier named Ollie, owned by Mike Daube, a public health expert in Perth, Australia. Daube ginned up an intentionally absurd CV for his dog, claiming that she was senior lecturer at…

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Surgeons close internal incisions with stitches and staples but they, and their patients, would benefit from a glue that stays stuck even to wet tissue and organs. Researchers from McGill University in Montreal are making progress with a powerful new glue inspired by the the sticky slime secreted by…

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When astronaut Peggy Whitson pushed out of the International Space Station’s airlock on Tuesday morning, she was floating into history. Stipulated, Whitson was already a badass. But this extra-vehicular activity—an EVA, NASAspeak for a spacewalk—was Whitson’s 10th. That ties her for the American record. A PhD biochemist before she became…

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